If the project’s cost of capital (discount rate) is 12.5%, what is the project’s NPV? Should the project be accepted? Why or why not?

If the project’s cost of capital (discount rate) is 12.5%, what is the project’s NPV? Should the project be accepted? Why or why not?.

Cash Flow Estimation and Capital Budgeting

Applying Various Capital Budgeting Methodologies

The objective of a firm is to maximize shareholder wealth.  The Net Present Value (NPV) method is one of the useful methods that help financial managers to maximize shareholders’ wealth.

Suppose the company that you selected for the Module 1 SLP is considering a new project that will have an initial cash outflow of $125,000,000.  The project is expected to have the following cash inflows:

Year    Cash Flow ($)

1          2,000,000

2          3,500,000

3          13,500,000

4          89,750,000

5          115,000,000

6          120,000,000

If the project’s cost of capital (discount rate) is 12.5%, what is the project’s NPV? Should the project be accepted?  Why or why not?

You may use the following steps to calculate NPV:

1.         Calculate present value (PV) of cash inflow (CF)

PV of CF = CF1 / (1+r)^1 + CF2 / (1+r)^2 + CF3 / (1+r)^3 + CF4 / (1+r)^4 + CF5 / (1+r)^5 + CF6 / (1+r)^6

Where the CFs are the cash flows and r = the project’s discount rate.

2.         Calculate NPV

NPV = Total PV of CF – Initial cash outflow

or -Initial cash outflow + Total PV of CF

r = Discount rate (12.5%)

If you do not know how to use Excel or a financial calculator for these calculations, please use the present value tables.


If the project’s cost of capital (discount rate) is 12.5%, what is the project’s NPV? Should the project be accepted? Why or why not?

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