I will pay for the following essay SOC 428 (Families, Delinquency, & Crimes. The essay is to be 8 pages with three to five sources, with in-text citations and a reference page.The impact of working mo

I will pay for the following essay SOC 428 (Families, Delinquency, & Crimes. The essay is to be 8 pages with three to five sources, with in-text citations and a reference page.

The impact of working mothers on childcare and development of young children is even greater. With less time to spend together as a family, the development of children is then influenced to an even greater extent on external factors outside the family circle. The school environment, the social interaction with other children in the neighborhood, participation in local clubs and societies etc. take on a bigger role in shaping the social character of the child and extent, if any, of an inclination towards antisocial behaviors.

The importance of greater time for social interaction of parents with their children in the context of the relationship between family variables and child behavior is discussed in Family Process journal1, wherein it states that “although a diversity of factors may be associated with the development and maintenance of conduct/oppositional disorders in children, of primary importance are the moment-to-moment interactions that the child has with his or her primary caregivers.” It is an unfortunate present day reality that in many families, parents do not spend sufficient time with their children as they used to, usually due to work commitments. So it is no surprise that they acquire habits, attitudes and behaviors from elsewhere that prove detrimental to their future lives.

As far as the effects of the neighborhood is concerned on family processes, especially in the absence of sufficient parental involvement in the lives of their children, it too can be a significant factor. Emily and Daniel2 conducted a longitudinal study from toddlerhood to school entry of the impact of neighborhood disadvantage on early child overt behavior problems in a low-income, urban sample of 281 African American and European American boys. Neighborhood effects on boys behavior emerged, albeit only at age 6 at the extreme of neighborhood disadvantage. Findings suggested that boys in underclass