Hi, need to submit a 3000 words essay on the topic Post-World War 2 Britain was still bound by a rigid class system which restricted the freedom of individuals within it. Compare and contrast your thr

Hi, need to submit a 3000 words essay on the topic Post-World War 2 Britain was still bound by a rigid class system which restricted the freedom of individuals within it. Compare and contrast your three texts in the light of this view, exploring how they support or challenge this view.

It is against this backdrop, that major conflicts and wars have been fought, most of the time with disastrous outcomes.

The end of the Second World War. this in favor of the Allied Forces, heralded a new beginning that was to impact greatly on latter generations, into the 21st Century. The – Bill of Rights, Liberalism (the dominant school of thought), Capitalism (as the superior economic model) coupled with free-market economy ideals, lesser government regulation and interference of markets, and free and fair elections, among others, are some of the reasons that have aided changes in society.

Different writers had the privileges of enjoying some of the above, with various acclaimed works being completed and performed to audiences at different theatres. They were able to elicit both love and hate. this from the audiences who were consciously touched by the diverse works. The reactions of the audiences. this to the different works, were frequently informed by the different perspectives that people had of the society, especially in Great Britain.

John Osborne’s piece – Look Back in Anger – first produced in 1956, elicited major controversy with influential critics of the time. such as Kenneth Tynan (the Observer Newspaper), categorizing it as a first in originality. as pertaining to a new generational outlook. Others, though, hated both the play and the society it conveyed unto them. This therefore heralded a new voice on the social arena of Britain.

It came to epitomize a radical shift to the then used drawing-room comedies created by such greats as Terrence Rattigan, Noel Coward, among others, who had subjugated the West End theatre stage by the 1950s. Their works were based on the lives of affluent bourgeoisie characters that were at play in their country homes’ drawing rooms, or of a part of the lifestyles of the upper middle class. Osborne and other latter writers, as an alternative, dwelt on the lower middle class and their working class