Guided Response: Review at least two of your classmates’ posts and suggest an additional theoretical justification to support the proposed challenge or offer real-life examples to illustrate imple

 Guided Response: Review at least two of your classmates’ posts and suggest an additional theoretical justification to support the proposed challenge or offer real-life examples to illustrate implementation. 

Camille Nunez

Barriers that a professional could experience would depend if the student is Stage 1 or 2 of Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development (1976). Students in the first stage, may simply opt not to participate with the class or teachings. They might not interrupt or say negative comments, but they will not add to the class either.  In this Heteronomous Morality stage, they will not cause harm to the group or facilitators, but they feel that they are not harming the class if they do not participate either.  Their participation and persistence may be nonexistent.  They may not realize that collaboration between students benefits all involved.

During the second stage, Individualistic Instrumental Morality, students are more individualistic and more concerned about following rules if there is a benefit for them.  During the beginning of class, if students in this stage does not see a mutual benefit in the class, they may lose motivation, decide not to continue and not be engaged.  If there is a grade attached to participation and persistence (such as in this class where we are graded for class participation, discussion sessions or group chats,) they will then participate as it is in their best interest in achieving an acceptable grade. 

In one of my training classes, I once asked the class to “kindly” return from lunch at 1:30pm and explained that I was giving them an additional 25 minutes of lunch but to abuse my generosity.  Although the majority of class returned by 1:30, there were several students who would walk in 2-5 minutes later than was given.  The next day I gave new rules. I said that for every minute one of the peers arrived late, the entire class would leave that many minutes later in the afternoon. That day the entire class arrived at 1:25. They all understood the benefit of arriving on time and agreed it would not be fair to have to stay longer because of the tardiness of any particular individual.  In the same manner persistence can be tied in to something that all participants can see as beneficial.

Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F. M., Patton, L. D., & Renn, K. A. (2010). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.(2nd ed.). Retrieved from https://www.vitalsource.com (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Kohlberg, L. (1976). Moral stages and moralization: The cognitive-developmental approach. In T. Lickona (Ed.), Moral development and behavior: Theory, research, and social issues (pp. 31–53). New York: Holt.

Anika Guidry

The barriers that a professional could experience would depend on the student. I chose the Heteronomous Morality stage. As a second-grade teacher I face this barrier but I get parents involved to prevent the situation early. I have a few students do just enough to get by and stay out of trouble. As a grade school teacher, my students still get report cards so their goal is to have a grade that their parents will approve. This becomes a barrier for the instructor when the student only pays attention enough to briefly grasp the lesson and wing the rest of the assignment.

The strategy I would use as a higher learning instructor is to ask questions during the lesson when I notice the student is not paying attention. I would also inform the student that I will have surprise quizzes and will put random questions on them.

Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F. M., Patton, L. D., & Renn, K. A. (2010). Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.(2nd ed.). Retrieved from https://www.vitalsource.com (Links to an external site.)