Enter the data that you collected during the experiment (from Tables 1 and 2 in the procedure) HERE. Remember to adjust the number of Rounds for…

Round NumberDaughter Atoms ProducedNOT the cumulative daughter atomsexclude Round 0Make sure to label the axes including the units in parentheses but be sure to REMOVE the chart title and any default figure legend put in by the graphing software. In the figure legend (1 – 2 sentences in text below the graph), explain the data in your graph.

See other general tips for making graphs in the How to Make a Graph in Excel document located in the Introductory Materials for this lab.

  1. Consider the trend shown in your graph in Question 5. Is it linear, exponential growth or exponential decay? Is this trend consistent with your expectations for the kinetics of a nuclear reaction? Briefly explain why.
  1. Scientists like to use data to build physical models (or physical models to predict how data will look). Linear trends are easiest to work with; so we often look for ways to identify linear trends in a data set. Nuclear reactions all follow first order kinetics meaning the rate of a nuclear reaction is given by:

ktransformedintegrated rate law

lnt t

Round NumberNatural Log of Concentration of Daughter Atoms You will want to exclude the last Round from each trial. Make sure to label the axes including the units in parentheses but be sure to REMOVE the chart title and any default figure legend put in by the graphing software. In the figure legend (1 – 2 sentences in text below the graph), explain the data in your graph.

Draw a trend line (OR straight line of best fit) through your data points (include the equation of your trend line and the R2 value in the figure legend below the graph).

See other general tips for making graphs in the How to Make a Graph in Excel document located in the Introductory Materials for this lab.

  1. Consider the trend lines in Question 7 and answer the following questions.
  2. What is the equation for your trend line for Trial 1? Trial 2?
  1. In regard to the integrated rate law (see blue equation in Question 7) for a nuclear reaction, what does the slope represent?
  1. In regard to the integrated rate law (see blue equation in Question 7) for a nuclear reaction, what does the y-intercept represent?
  1. According to your data, if you started from twice as many candies as you had available to you, how many cycles of decay would your candy need to go through for all of it to decay? Explain.
  1. Putting it all together! Radioisotopes are often used in diagnostic imaging for detecting disease. The isotope 18F, which has a half-life of 110 min, is used in medical imaging. What percentage of the original activity in the sample remains after 300 min? Show your work, include units, and pay attention to significant figures.

Remember that half-life is given by:

2. Enter the data that you collected during the experiment (from Tables 1 and 2 in theprocedure) HERE. Remember to adjust the number of Rounds for each Trial to how manyyou completed.TRIAL 1TRIAL 2SkittlesSkittlesSkittlesSkittlesRound"S" Up"S" DownCumulativeDaughterRound"S" Up"S" DownCumulative(Parent(Daughter(ParentDaughterAtoms)Atoms)Atoms(DaughterAtoms)Atoms)Atoms5500055002332322728281211431543851548051UP WN250WOOO NO UP W N H OSSNNH25350053454547891010