Create a 3 page essay paper that discusses Response Paper 2.For example, if someone is in a concentration camp for nothing but being Polish, they are a victim. But, if they are extorting other people

Create a 3 page essay paper that discusses Response Paper 2.

For example, if someone is in a concentration camp for nothing but being Polish, they are a victim. But, if they are extorting other people in the concentration camp by acting as an informant to the Nazi guards, they are also victimizing other people. Therefore, it is possible to be, at the same time, victim and victimized. there is always someone on some higher level, who is victimizing the person victimizing you. In Gross’ book, this relationship is made very clearly.

Gross’ book is not perfect, although it does refer to patterns of concentration camp victimization, because the book is also the victim, and perhaps has been victimizing the reader. Time will tell, but there are accusations that Gross left out dozens of licenses for different people – witnesses, defendants, etc., who spoke on the role of the German outbreak of food poisoning, and instead just quoted the witnesses, which indicated the participation of Poles. It was argued, among other things, the first test of a chef Julia Sokolowski, which was later withdrawn, and the material Karol Bardon, a German policeman, who was sentenced to death, tried to dilute its responsibility and blame residents of the city. Professor Gross has never explained the reasons for his choice. He never explained why he accepts some of the documents and rejects others. “I am convinced that Neighbors is a book which had to be written and which is needed. Facing up to the painful truth of Jedwabne is, in my conviction, the most serious test that we Poles have had to confront in the last decade” (Strembzosz, 2001). In reality, ideas of victimization in terms of this book may run deeper than expected, if any part of it is found to be fabricated. “A subsequent investigation conducted by the&nbsp.Polish Institute of National Remembrance&nbsp.(IPN) largely supported Grosss conclusions&nbsp.The IPN investigation concluded that “residents of Jedwabne and its environs, of Polish nationality, committed